Shampoo and conditioner without water? It’s an idea that can cause a person to take a break.

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Shampoo and conditioner without water? It’s an idea that can cause a person to take a break.

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“It’s something really new and different,” Jayme Jenkins, co-founder and chief brand officer of the Toronto-based company everist admits their innovative formulas of Waterless Shampoo Concentrate and Waterless Conditioner Concentrate.

While the idea may first lead a consumer to imagine a type of product designed to be applied to dry hair, in reality the “waterless” claim applies to the patent-pending formulation itself. .

“We are truly anhydrous, so our product has no water in the formula,” says Jessica Stevenson, co-founder and CEO. “We’re first in the paste format, but of course there are bars and powders in this space.”

School friends, Jenkins and Stevenson worked for more than two decades at various major beauty brands, including L’Oréal, Revlon, The Body Shop and Nude by Nature. It was through these experiences that they gleaned the idea for Everist.

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“We have obviously seen the trend shift towards a demand for sustainable products. And that’s really where Everist started,” says Stevenson.

Jessica Stevenson, left, and Jayme Jenkins are the co-founders of new clean beauty brand Everist.
Jessica Stevenson, left, and Jayme Jenkins are the co-founders of new clean beauty brand Everist. Photo by Everist/Maddie Mellott

However, their first agenda was not water, but rather to target plastic waste.

“Everything in beauty is plastic. And we saw it as a problem and something that needed solutions,” says Jenkins. “It was very difficult to change from within these big beauty companies. So we really wanted to take the opportunity to go out on our own and completely reinvent what a beauty company should look like today. And do something very different.

The duo wondered what beauty might look like without the use of single-use plastics. And Everist’s model of offering “infinitely recyclable” aluminum tubes, with plastic caps reclaimed by the brand for reuse with a prepaid shipping label through its CapBack program, is the result.

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“We looked at things like retail refills, slag refill models, shampoo bars — we looked at so many things,” Jenkins says of the packaging choice. “Ultimately the idea that was our starting point was a trend that we’ve seen in the United States in the home cleaning industry where we’ve seen these cool brands pop up based on the idea that cleaning products cleaning for your home were mostly water and a bit of the active ingredient, so there were these brands that sold concentrates that you mix at home with water.

This idea, they say, prompted their haha” moment.

“We thought there had to be an application for that in beauty. Beauty products are mostly water. And when we took a closer look at the hair care category in particular, it seemed like a good place to start because shampoos and conditioners are 70-80% water. They’re almost always in single-use plastic bottles, they’re full of synthetic chemicals to stabilize them with all that water in them – so we thought there might be something to build on,” says Jenkins. “And that led us to the innovation that we have now.”

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Applied in the shower to wet hair – Stevenson recommends using a half inch strip for short hair, an inch for medium length and an inch and a half for “very thick or curly hair” – shampoo should be rubbed into the palm of your hand to create a cream, then lather into the hair as you normally would with traditional shampoo products.

“We say lather for about 30 seconds and that’s because you’ll start to feel the coconut-derived surfactants start to puff up in your hair and create that rich, velvety lather,” Stevenson suggests. The conditioner is designed to be left on for three minutes and goes on “almost like a serum,” says Stevenson.

Both products are vegan, cruelty-free, sulfate-free, paraben-free, safe for colored hair, and suitable for a wide variety of hair types, the duo explain. And, due to the water-free angle, the products are also preservative-free.

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“Water in cosmetic formulas is what fuels bacteria growth,” says Jenkins. “So because we’ve eliminated the water 100%, we’re able to safely dispense with a preservative-free product.”

Available in 100 milliliter aluminum tubes for $28 each, the hair care products are priced as offering the equivalent amount of product to a traditional 300ml bottle of shampoo or conditioner.

In addition to cleansing and moisturizing hair, Stevenson says the curated list of plant-based, biodegradable ingredients, which includes a blend of five essential oils that “all have benefits for the hair and scalp,” including including bergamot and peppermint, were chosen to further promote the “skinification” trend towards more demanding scalp care.

“The first ingredient is vegetable glycerin — not water,” says Stevenson. “The second is your surfactant and the third is aloe vera. So they’re very good for your hair, good for your skin type of ingredients.

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Everist is billed as a “zero waste” company, meaning it has a “net neutral” impact on the planet. They joined the company Climate neutral to offset its carbon emissions through transport and production with carbon credits and is a member of 1% for the planet which sees at least one percent of the company’s annual sales donated to environmental causes.

“We believe it should be the responsibility of all businesses to be responsible for the waste they create. We don’t believe it should be left to the end customer to decide what to do with the plastic shampoo bottle,” says Jenkins, “That’s not how we’re going to make this big change that we need to see.”

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