Tetra Bio-Pharma reports that the company’s research on cannabis plant residues has shown that what was previously considered “waste” can increase the growth of beneficial gut microbes.

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If granted, the patent application would protect the use of cannabis plant residues containing cannabinoids within a specified range of profiles as an “oral prebiotic component alone or in combination with other pro, post, para or prebiotics as a dietary supplement for gastrointestinal health “.

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Tetra reports that the company’s research on cannabis plant residues has shown that what was previously considered ‘waste’ can increase the growth of beneficial gut microbes, including both Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Bifidobacterium longum.

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The Ottawa-based company is working with South Carolina-based Thorne HealthTech to achieve GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) status from the United States Food and Drug Administration, potentially allowing the new ingredient to be included in foods and dietary supplements.

Cannabis has long been linked to gut health and has been shown to benefit people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, and other gastrointestinal disorders. .

“Cannabis use is common in IBD patients for symptom relief, especially in those with a history of abdominal surgery, chronic abdominal pain and / or a low quality of life index,” concluded the researchers in a 2011 study published in European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

A research review published in The Journal of Endocrinological Investigation found that cannabis “exerts biological functions in the gastrointestinal tract by activating two types of cannabinoid receptors, the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 receptor) and the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (receptor CB2).

“The endocannabinoid system could represent a promising new therapeutic target against various gastrointestinal disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease, functional bowel disease and disorders related to secretion and motility,” the researchers concluded.

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